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Updated: 5 min 3 sec ago

Australia v England: third rugby union Test match – live!

6 min 53 sec ago
ulliLive updates from the final match of the series at Allianz Stadium in Sydney/liliEmail: a href="mailto:[email protected]"[email protected]/a | Tweet: a href="https://twitter.com/PFConnolly"@PFConnolly/abr /li/ulp class="block-time published-time" time datetime="2016-06-25T10:15:47.683Z"11.15am span class="timezone"BST/span/time /ppstrong6 min/strong The first scrum of the match; 347kg vs 347kg. And before Phipps can get the ball in the referee blows his whistle, a short-arm penalty to England./ppThings happen inside these scrums of which we mortals know nothing. But at least they are known unknowns; unlike many other things I’m too thick to not know I know nothing about. /pp class="block-time published-time" time datetime="2016-06-25T10:14:21.091Z"11.14am span class="timezone"BST/span/time /ppstrong5 min/strong A kicking duel! Foley kicks deep to Nowell and he replies with afters, his booming kick finding touch metres out from the Wallabies’ line. But the Wallabies get the ball back into play in a jiffy./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/live/2016/jun/25/australia-v-england-third-rugby-union-test-match-live"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

EU referendum: Pro-Brexit MEP admits free movement of labour may not end – live

6 min 58 sec ago
ullia href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jun/24/bank-of-england-markets-pound-shares-plummet-brexit-vote-carney"Moody’s lowers UK outlook from stable to negative/a/liliOver $2tn wiped out on markets worldwidebr/liliEuropean foreign ministers meet in Berlinbr/liliScottish cabinet to discuss new independence referendum/lilia href="http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/25/eu-referendum-morning-briefing-markets-brexit-foreign-ministers-scotland"strongThe day’s key points: read the morning briefing/strong/a/lilia href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/may/31/eu-referendum-morning-briefing-sign-up"Sign up for our morning briefing email/a/li/ulp class="block-time published-time" time datetime="2016-06-25T10:12:42.888Z"11.12am span class="timezone"BST/span/time /ppWe’re also waiting for Scotland’s first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, to emerge from a cabinet meeting by the Scottish government in Edinburgh./ppa href="http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/24/alex-salmond-second-scottish-independence-referendum-is-certain"It comes after she said/a she believed a second referendum on independence was highly likely after a href="http://www.theguardian.com/uk/scotland"Scotland/a voted overwhelmingly to remain within the EU./pp class="block-time published-time" time datetime="2016-06-25T10:03:42.205Z"11.03am span class="timezone"BST/span/time /ppHere’s the poster that would have been used to promote Jeremy Corbyn’s (now cancelled) appearance at Glastonbury/pp lang="en" dir="ltr"Check out poster that would have gone out if a href="https://twitter.com/jeremycorbyn"@jeremycorbyn/a had made it to Glasto a href="https://t.co/KV0UzKR8FX"pic.twitter.com/KV0UzKR8FX/a/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2016/jun/25/brexit-live-emergency-meetings-eu-uk-leave-vote"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

In this Brexit vote, the poor turned on an elite who ignored them | Ian Jack

27 min 18 sec ago
The neglected suddenly discovered they could use their EU referendum vote to get back at those who had never listened to their grievancespJust as the pound was reaching its peak, Iain Duncan Smith said: “Turnout in the council estates is very high.” It was about quarter past ten. When he added a few minutes later that he’d been in politics for 24 years and couldn’t remember seeing an equivalent council-estate turnout before, David Dimbleby wondered about its significance: was it good news for a href="http://www.theguardian.com/politics/eu-referendum" title=""the Brexit campaign/a? Duncan Smith said piously that he couldn’t possibly say, but we knew that he thought it was. By midnight, the pound had begun its fall./ppMy wife and I grew up on council estates – small, well-gardened ones, a hundred miles from each other across the border of Scotland and England. Almost everyone we knew lived similarly. People of our parents’ generation thought of public housing as a blessing, compared to the shabby and cramped homes they had lived in before. “They talk about council estates as though they’re slums,” my wife said as we watched the coverage. Or native reservations, I thought. Earlier that day on our London high street, a canvasser for remain told me how they divided the work: the Greens got the tube stations, Lib Dems did the shoppers, Labour went “round the estates”./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/25/brexit-vote-poor-elite"Continue reading.../a
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To mend the Brexit rift, let’s respect other people’s feelings – and honestly face our own | Phillipa Perry

30 min 31 sec ago
If we want to heal the wound, we must stop throwing ‘the facts’ at each other, and stop pretending to be such rational creaturespOne of the more personal effects of the Brexit vote is the damage it has done to relationships between remain and leave voters. With so many of the a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/03/younger-voters-eu-referendum-turnout-poll-brexit" title=""older generation voting to exit/a and their children voting to remain, there will be rifts in many families that need to be mended./ppFor my own part, I’m fed up. With the result, yes, because I wanted it to go the other way. But more than that, as a therapist I’m fed up with how we have failed to communicate./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/25/brexit-rift-feelings-honest"Continue reading.../a
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Brexit front pages - in pictures

38 min 45 sec ago
pFront pages from across the globe react to the result of the European Union referendum and David Cameron’s resignation/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/gallery/2016/jun/25/brexit-front-pages-in-pictures"Continue reading.../a
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New Zealand thrash Wales to seal series whitewash as Beauden Barrett shines

51 min 9 sec ago
• New Zealand 46-6 Walesbr /• Barrett scores 26 points as All Blacks dominate Warren Gatland’s sidepThe long wait for a win over New Zealand continues after Wales suffered a ‘blackwash’ in their three-Test series against the world champions. The All Blacks had wrapped up the series with their a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/jun/18/new-zealand-wales-match-report" title=""36-22 win in Wellington last weekend/a and they made it 3-0 with a 46-6 triumph here in Dunedin./ppThat made it win No29 in a row over Wales and they not only maintained their unbeaten record at the indoor Forsyth Barr Stadium stadium but extended their home run to an amazing 41 consecutive victories. If anyone thought there might be a drop off in the All Blacks after they made it back-to-back World Cup victories because of the retirements of so many world class players, they were wrong. They may have lost the experience of players with more than 800 caps combined, but such is their strength in depth they have a heap of talent waiting to step into the breach./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/jun/25/new-zealand-wales-match-report"Continue reading.../a
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New Zealand v Wales: third Test – live!

1 hour 9 min ago
ulliAll Blacks v Wales: Minute-by-minute updates from the third Test in Dunedin/lilia href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/jun/19/luke-charteris-wales-tour-new-zealand-all-rugby-all-blacks"Luke Charteris: Wales can still end tour of New Zealand on a high/a/liliEmail a href="mailto:[email protected]"[email protected]/a or tweet: a href="https://twitter.com/DanLucas86"@DanLucas86/a/li/ulp class="block-time published-time" time datetime="2016-06-25T09:13:01.900Z"10.13am span class="timezone"BST/span/time /ppstrong71 min /strongGareth Davies is caught by Aaron Smith but Wales retain it and Jon Davies sends a long kick straight to Dagg. Back come New Zealand, swinging it left and looking for space. Penalty to the All Blacks for Jenkins’ – I think – failure to roll away. Sopoaga finds touch on the left, just six metres out from the Welsh line. It’s going to be a long nine minutes for Warren Gatland’s men./pp class="block-time published-time" time datetime="2016-06-25T09:11:00.258Z"10.11am span class="timezone"BST/span/time /ppstrong70 min /strongWales are reeling backwards towards their own line even in possession. There’s a kiwi hand in there though and it spills the ball forwards. Jenkins comes on for Warburton./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/live/2016/jun/25/new-zealand-v-wales-third-test-live"Continue reading.../a
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Philip Glass on David Bowie: 'He was a master unto himself'

1 hour 22 min ago
pIn a spectacular tribute to David Bowie, the US composer’s Heroes symphony is being performed at midnight on Saturday at Glastonbury’s Park stage. Ahead of the set, he discusses his longstanding friendship with the late musician/ppI first met David when I was in my mid-thirties and he was in his early 20s, just a kid out of art school turning from being a painter into being a composer. We lived close to each other in New York. There were periods when we saw each other a lot and other periods when we didn’t – I never knew exactly where he was or where he was going to be and sometimes we didn’t see each other for years, but we were always in touch and talked about how things were going . He was an extremely gifted and interesting person and musician. We had both a friendship and a working relationship. We did several concerts and projects together, and of course I wrote two symphonies based on his work, No 1 (the Low symphony) in 1992 and No 4 (Heroes) in 1996./ppDavid liked the idea that I was doing the symphonies. And he was very pleased with them, as was Brian Eno. They even had their pictures taken to feature alongside mine on the first edition of the a href="https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71tHEaTSIdL._SX355_.jpg"Low symphony album cover./a/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jun/25/philip-glass-on-david-bowie-he-was-a-master-unto-himself"Continue reading.../a
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Death by GPS: are satnavs changing our brains?

1 hour 22 min ago
pWe increasingly rely on GPS to get from A to B. But what happens if we’re led catastrophically astray – and are we losing our sense of direction?/ppOne early morning in March 2011, Albert Chretien and his wife, Rita, loaded their Chevrolet Astro van and drove away from their home in Penticton, British Columbia. Their destination was Las Vegas, where Albert planned to attend a trade show. Rather than stick to the most direct route, they decided to take a scenic road less travelled, a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idaho_State_Highway_51"Idaho State Highway 51/a. The Chretiens figured there had to be a turnoff from Idaho 51 that would lead them east to a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_93"US Route 93/a all the way to Vegas./ppAlbert and Rita had known each other since high school. During their 38 years of marriage, they had rarely been apart. They worked together, managing their own small excavation business. A few days before the trip, Albert had purchased a Magellan GPS unit for the van. They had not yet used it, but their plan wasn’t panning out. As the day went on and the shadows grew longer, they hadn’t found an eastward passage. They decided to consult the GPS. Checking their roadmap, they determined the nearest town was Mountain City, Nevada, so they entered it as the destination into their GPS unit. The directions led them on to a small dirt road near an Idaho ghost town and eventually to a confusing three-way crossroads. And here their troubles began./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/25/gps-horror-stories-driving-satnav-greg-milner"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

The gifs that keep on giving: Roy Keane, theatrical diving and a lifesaver of a catch

1 hour 37 min ago
pFeaturing a big leap, a silly fall, a couple of jumps, a new way of playing golf and the Republic of Ireland assistant manager showing off his humorous side/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/jun/25/gifs-giving-roy-keane-diving-football-baseball"Continue reading.../a
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Britain is not a rainy, fascist island – here’s my plan for ProgrExit | Paul Mason

1 hour 41 min ago
pSocial justice and democracy must be at the heart of Brexit negotiations. Progressives must unite to stop the UK turning into a Thatcherite wasteland/ppIn the a href="http://viewer.gutools.co.uk/preview/commentisfree/2016/jun/25/48-britain-regrexit-voted-remaon" title=""progressive half of British politics/a we need a plan to put our stamp on the Brexit result – and fast./ppWe must prevent the a href="http://viewer.gutools.co.uk/preview/commentisfree/2016/jun/24/leavers-take-control" title=""Conservative right/a using the Brexit negotiations to reshape Britain into a rule-free space for corporations; we need to take control of the process whereby the rights of the citizen are redefined against those of a newly sovereign state./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/25/britain-rainy-fascist-island-progrexit-brexit"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Brexit wipes $2tn off markets as Moody's lowers UK credit rating outlook

2 hours 21 min ago
pAmid concerns that the EU referendum result risks sparking fresh financial crisis, Bank of England governor says it is ready to do whatever is needed /pullia href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/live/2016/jun/25/brexit-live-emergency-meetings-eu-uk-leave-vote"Emergency meetings as EU pushes for UK to act – live/a/li/ulpRatings agency Moody’s has lowered the outlook for the UK’s credit rating from stable to negative amid what it said would prove a prolonged period of uncertainty following Britain’s vote to leave the European Union./ppMoody’s said the unpredictability of British decision-making had factored into its move, as had the likelihood of lower economic growth which it said would outweigh any savings the UK might hope to get from not having to contribute to the EU budget./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jun/24/bank-of-england-markets-pound-shares-plummet-brexit-vote-carney"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Look sharp: Yotam Ottolenghi’s gooseberry recipes

2 hours 22 min ago
pForget strawberries: for me, gooseberries are the true taste of British summertime/ppUntil I moved to England in my 20s, I hadn’t even heard of the gooseberry, let alone eaten one. As always when I feel an outsider to a British food tradition, I turned to a href="http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/mar/15/jane-grigson-her-life-and-legacy"Jane Grigson/a for advice, because the world she conjures in her books makes me feel both included and excluded at the same time: her writing is so wonderfully vivid, yet it’s also just so brilliantly, quintessentially British./ppAs she writes in a href="http://bookshop.theguardian.com/good-things.html"Good Things/a, “Gooseberries… provide the first fruit of the year. Unless you count strawberries flown in from Kenya. I don’t.” She then cites the 1920s fruit gourmet and grower Edward Bunyard’s description of this glorious berry as “the fruit par excellence for ambulant consumption. The freedom of the bush should be given to all visitors… and the exercise of gathering, too, is beneficial to the middle-aged and also stimulates their absorptive capacity.” Bunyard, Grigson goes on, delights in that “sociable summer hour which ambles along – or used to – between Matins and Sunday lunch”. See what I mean by quintessentially British?/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jun/25/gooseberry-recipes-yotam-ottolenghi-slaw-dried-fool-salsa"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Joe Wicks's Uncle Ben’s advert: more proof that Instagram is the worst

2 hours 22 min ago
pFirst it gave us sausage legs, now the picture sharing app is responsible for thoroughly useless rice advice/ppIs Instagram the worst thing that’s happened to us recently? Sausage legs and filter overdoses aren’t as bad as Donald Trump in the grand scheme of things, but Instagram has brought countless fitness gurus to fame and must be punished for it./pp Joe Wicks is one: he is 30 years old and from Surbiton, where he presumably got bored enough to start Instagramming pictures of himself and his grub, which made him so popular that Uncle Ben’s has shoved him into one of its adverts for its Healthy Meals Made Easy./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2016/jun/25/joe-wickss-uncle-bens-advert-more-proof-that-instagram-is-the-worst"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

What I’m really thinking: the cam girl

2 hours 22 min ago
pThe first time I logged on was terrible. I was scared and found it hard to deal with the strange things clients ask you to do/ppI tried webcam work for the first time at the age of 20, when I found myself homeless with my three-year-old daughter. A friend said we could stay with her while I tried to save some money, and she mentioned that she worked as a “cam girl”./ppThe first time I logged on was terrible. I was scared and found it hard to deal with the way clients talk to you and the strange things they ask you to do. I don’t tolerate sexism and view porn as incredibly damaging for women. I made a deal with myself to stop as soon as I was back on my feet. It wasn’t what I’d been expecting (someone wanted me to cover myself in custard; another paid me to sit motionless, back to the camera, and got angry when I sneezed)./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jun/25/what-im-really-thinking-the-webcam-worker"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Getting down with the kids: should parents go to Glastonbury? | Hadley Freeman

2 hours 22 min ago
pI’ve been listening to Justin Bieber on a loop, and am gripped by the Hiddleswift romance. Did I mention I’m 38?/ppOne of my favourite things to do as a child was to sit on the living room rug and look through my father’s university yearbook. I loved that book: aside from the novelty of seeing my father young (and with hair!), it seemed like such an exotic historical artefact. My dad had gone to college in the 1950s, and all those black-and-white photos of young men with square haircuts and buttoned-up white shirts were so distant from my world, they might as well have been taken in the 1850s./ppMy parents weren’t like Captain von Trapp at the beginning of a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/02/sound-of-music-at-50"The Sound Of Music/a, cold and cut off from his kids, but there was a definite boundary between their world and mine, reinforced in my mind by that yearbook. I found that immensely reassuring. I could shelter in that boundary when I was overwhelmed by my life, look at theirs and know that all this childish nonsense would soon pass. Being an adult would be different. Which is why I feel a little sorry for my own children./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/25/parents-glastonbury-generation-hadley-freeman"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Jennifer Saunders: ‘It's still easier for a gang of boys to get a TV show’

2 hours 22 min ago
pMore than 20 years after creating Ab Fab, the queen of the double act has revived our favourite booze-addled duo. She reveals why she never argues, shrugs off failure – and wants more women to do panel shows/ppInterview: Elizabeth Day. Portrait: Perou/ppWe’re about five minutes into our interview when Jennifer Saunders lets slip the N-word. She is sitting in a dimly lit private members’ club off Oxford Street in central London. The sofas are grey velvet, the walls are dark and Saunders is dressed in floating shades of navy blue: a silky top that billows like expensive drapery over her trousers, cropped at the ankle to reveal slip-on trainers./ppSaunders is friendly but self-contained. Her smile doesn’t linger on her face longer than strictly necessary. The first few questions are politely answered, but she has a slightly distracted air, as if her mind is on other matters./p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2016/jun/25/jennifer-saunders-ab-fab-absolutely-fabulous-not-good-at-doing-things-on-my-own"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

The 20 photographs of the week

2 hours 25 min ago
pBritain votes for Brexit, David Cameron resigns, the final group matches at Euro 2016, the continuing violence in Syria – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2016/jun/25/the-20-photographs-of-the-week"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Now it’s time for Labour to listen to its voters | John Mann

2 hours 37 min ago
Traditional Labour supporters voted to leave the EU and create a fairer workplace. My party must not only listen, but take action to protect their rightspThe EU referendum has exposed the major a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/23/labour-traditional-voters-progressive-values-working-class-ukip" title=""schism between Labour and its core voters/a. The Labour party in Westminster struggled to reflect the language and aspirations of our traditional working-class communities. These Labour voters, aware of the long-term neglect of their voice and their aspirations, decided the result of the referendum. It should be no surprise to anyone that they chose to comfortably ignore the Labour call to vote remain./pp spanRelated: /spana href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/17/britain-working-class-revolt-eu-referendum"Britain is in the midst of a working-class revolt | John Harris/a /p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/25/wake-up-call-labour-party-supporters-leave-eu"Continue reading.../a
Categories: News Monitor

Hisham Matar: 'I don't remember a time when words were not dangerous'

2 hours 52 min ago
pAs a schoolboy in Tripoli, the author was captivated by Arabic. But when his family was forced to leave, it was in English that he came to speak, think and write/ppBefore everything, there was Libya. The boys and I would gather on our street in Tripoli during the aimless afternoon hours. The sun would still be strong, its power seeming to increase as it descended. You feared losing it, as though it were ever possible for the sun to never rise again. One such afternoon, one of the boys suggested I draw something. He had asked me this because I had just found, in one of the empty building lots on our street, a good stick. It was long and thin and strong, producing, when I struck the air with it, a beautiful whistle. “Go on, anything,” he said. Feeling the attention of the others, I quickly drew into the sand the map of our country: a square with the wiggly line of the north coast. The boys said it wasn’t right. I had missed the step where, in the south-east, Sudan cuts in a corner, and I hadn’t got the snaking curve of our Mediterranean, where the sea sticks its tongue into Brega, quite right either. This was two years before I left Libya and would not see Tripoli and our street for another 33 years./ppI was seven that year. The two things I excelled at were strange and, if anything, inspired the puzzlement rather than the admiration of my peers. I could swim further out into the sea than anyone dared, so far out, in fact, that the water became a different territory, icy, its surface the rough grain of stone and the depths, when I opened my eyes underwater, the black-blue of a bruise. I still recall the curious mixture of fear and accomplishment I felt when I would look back and see that the land had disappeared. No matter how tall I would paddle myself up out of the water, I could not see the shore or my friends, who had been swimming behind me at first but after yelling, “Hisham, you’re crazy”, one by one had fallen back and turned to swim towards the beach. I would remain there alone and let the sea’s conversation, rising and falling in gentle waves, carry me with it. Even though my heart would be pounding by now and there was no one to see me, I would dare myself even further: I would close my eyes and spin around myself until I lost direction. I would make a guess and begin swimming back where I thought the shore might be. Somehow, I never got it wrong. Not once.br/p a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jun/25/hisham-matar-i-dont-remember-a-time-when-words-were-not-dangerous"Continue reading.../a
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